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First Minister Update 11th May 2021

At the media briefing on the 11th May 2021,  the First Minister announced that from Monday 17th May most of mainland Scotland will move to Level 2, with eased restrictions on hospitality, entertainment, education and sport. You can read her full statement here.

We have highlighted the main changes below:

  • Move to level 2 with associated changes will go ahead as planned on Monday across most of Mainland Scotland from Monday 17th May
  • Moray will remain at level 3
  • Many island communities will move to level 1

The rest of Scotland will move to Level 2

  • Outdoors: 8 people from 8 households can meet.
  • Indoors and private gardens: 6 people from 3 households, (including overnight stays) can meet without physical distancing.
  • A wider review of the need for physical distancing in other settings is underway with a view to relaxing this in more public spaces.
  • Hospitality 6 people from 3 households are now permitted indoors (with social distancing) alcohol allowed indoors until 10: 30 pm in 2-hour booked slots.
  • Outdoor contact sports and indoor group exercise classes will be able to restart
  • Further opening of venues including cinema & theatre
  • Limit for events goes up to 100 (indoors), 250 (outdoors – unrestricted standing), 500 (outdoors – restricted seating)

Moray

The new rules will apply to all mainland local authority areas with the exception of Moray, which is experiencing a high and increasing number of Coronavirus cases. As a result Moray is likely to remain in Level 3 for a further period, with travel in and out of the area prohibited other than for permitted purposes. A final decision on this will be made at the end of this week. The Scottish Government is working with Moray Council and Grampian Health Board to reduce case numbers, and will provide financial support for affected hospitality and leisure businesses if Level 3 restrictions do remain in place.

Western Isles, Orkney, Shetland and remote Highland and Argyll islands

As the virus is now sufficiently under control in the Western Isles, Orkney, Shetland and remote Highland and Argyll islands, these communities are expected to move straight to Level 1.

International Travel

  • From 17 May, anyone entering Scotland from countries on a new international travel ‘Green List’ will not be required to quarantine on arrival, but will have to take a PCR test for COVID-19. The Green List will initially be the same as that in place for England but will be subject to review based on Scotland’s specific needs.
  • If you arrive from a country on the amber list – which will be the majority of countries – you must self-isolate at home for 10 days, and take two PCR tests during this period.
  • If you enter Scotland from a red list country – one of the countries identified as acute-risk under our current regulations – you will be required to enter a managed isolation hotel and stay there for 10 days. Due to changes coming into force from tomorrow, those countries will include Turkey, the Maldives and Nepal.

Please see the traffic light list of countries from England here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/red-amber-and-green-list-rules-for-entering-england

Next Steps
  • level 1, Monday 8th June
  • Level 0, Monday 29th June
  • Hope to be able to move towards removal of rules during summer

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No evidence of boom in sight for Scottish tourism according to industry body

Research published by the Scottish Tourism Alliance (STA), the representative body for tourism business in Scotland paints a stark picture for the sector in contrast to recent speculation that tourism in Scotland is set for a boom this summer.

The organisation conducted research, predominantly with hospitality businesses following the easing of some restrictions on 26th April and also collated the results of research undertaken by a number of member sectoral groups within the industry, totalling 980 responses.

The STA surveyed 271 businesses directly and found that 30% took the decision to remain closed from the 26th April; of those, 31% have said that they do not plan to reopen next week when restrictions will ease further.

The organisation’s research highlighted an extremely slow start to accommodation bookings; between 41 – 45% of accommodation providers who responded indicated that over the course of May, June and July, occupancy is sitting at below 20%.

62% of rural hotels have less than 50% occupancy for May and just 26% of rural hotels have indicated that they will have 60%+ occupancy for this month. The picture is almost identical for June and for July, 54% of rural hotels indicate that their occupancy will be lower than 50%; just 30% have said they expect occupancy of 60%+.

Predicated occupancy levels in the cities is worryingly low with 94% of hotels in cities reporting occupancy levels of below 50% in May, 98% of hotels in cities are reporting occupancy levels of below 50% in June and 87% of city hotels are reporting occupancy levels of below 50% in July.

This is also reflected in the recent STR data which shows forward occupancy levels for Glasgow hotels sitting at just 14% for May and June, dropping to 13% in July and rising slightly to 15% in August.  The picture is similar in Edinburgh with May occupancy at 19%, June 20%, July 19% rising to just 22% in August.

Of the 271 businesses surveyed by the STA, 38% said that their average gross food and beverage takings since reopening are below 20% and just 11% of respondents are taking between 76 – 100% of the norm.

Recent media reports have pointed towards a boom in tourism in Scotland however the latest research conducted by the STA, the Association of Scottish Visitor Attractions (ASVA), the Association of Scotland’s Self-Caterers (ASSC) and Wild Scotland, the trade body representing the adventure tourism sector shows that the industry is far from recovery and in many respects, is in a worse position now than it was a year ago.

According to research published by the ASSC which gleaned 262 responses, larger self-catering properties that rely on multiple households have been under either full closure or restricted trading since the first lockdown on 24th March 2020 and will continue to be affected until at least end of June 2021 according to the current route map, having only been able to enjoy ten viable weeks of trading.

Wild Scotland surveyed 105 members and found that 45% of respondents will operate at less than 50% of capacity due to current restrictions, with 64% referencing physical distancing as the main factor.  The association has said that many businesses within the adventure tourism sector will require further financial support to survive into 2022, particularly those with a reliance on the international market, those impacted by physical distancing and much of the marine tourism sector, some of which remains closed, facing a second year of no trading and potential business collapse.

The Association of Scotland’s Visitor Attractions surveyed their membership in April, receiving 342 responses and found that 54% of attractions will remain closed as a result of the continuation of 2m physical distancing or will lose money when they do reopen.”

STA Chief Executive, Marc Crothall said; “Our survey uncovered what we knew was happening across the industry from anecdotal conversations; that things were nowhere near as buoyant as has been suggested and in fact, that too many businesses across all sectors within our industry are continuing to operate in crisis mode.  The STA held three forums with hospitality, tourism and destination groups this week and all attending very much echoed our research findings.

While the smaller properties within the self-catering sector are looking at a positive level of recovery, other accommodation providers are struggling as bookings are not coming in at the level needed to trade viably over what would be the busiest part of the year and food and beverage income is far from healthy across the board, although this will hopefully change with the next easing of restrictions on 17th May.

It is also important to acknowledge that there is a recruitment crisis within the tourism and hospitality sector with all respondents to our survey indicating that they have vacancies; conversations I’ve had suggest that the picture is far more worrying across the sector, particularly in terms of the recruitment of chefs.

A great deal rides on the further easing of restrictions which come into force from next Monday and beyond, particularly for the night time economy and events industry, this really is the last chance for most of Scotland’s tourism industry to start to recoup some of the lost income from the past year, however I know that that easing will not go far enough for many as our research indicates; it may very well be too late for recovery.

Victoria Brooks, lead representative from Wild Scotland said:

“The good news is that some outdoor activity operators are experiencing high demand and are already receiving enquiries into 2022 which is incredibly positive. However, this is not the case across the whole sector. For many, it has been a very slow start – more of a distant rumble than the anticipated staycation boom predicted. Boat operators are significantly down on 2019 visitor numbers – this is due to limited capacity as a result of continued physical distancing restrictions, but they’re also experiencing very low demand which is incredibly disappointing and of course impacts massively on local and rural economies including accommodation, shops, cafes and restaurants. You can of course put some of this down to the weather, but businesses across the sector are very aware that consumer confidence is lacking – messaging has been mixed and of course we are missing our international visitors. The outdoor sector is also very reliant on mixed groups being able to gather in accommodation, in vehicles and on boats which remain restricted.

Tourism is vital to Scotland’s recovery but to survive we need to continue to invest both in businesses and infrastructure to support the anticipated demand. It is also imperative that consumer messaging relating to restrictions and travel is simple to understand across all four nations to restore consumer confidence and ensure we have a successful and hopefully extended season ahead.”

John Henderson, Founder of Born Brewery said:

“How does the industry feel at the moment? Both our rural and city centre publicans are definitely suffering. They have been burnt by lockdowns and brief re-openings, they have been burnt by poor outside trade due to recent weather, and they are, understandably, nervous about indoor re-opening this time around. No one knows what business will be like or how quickly it might pick up. For us, as a brewery with short shelf-life cask ale products, that’s a huge problem. We are the last product they will risk investing in as cask ale needs a constant through-put. And our sales, at 25% of the seasonal average, prove that. Things need to change fast, but consumers appear in no rush to get back to hospitality.”

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Epic swim for Scotland’s whales and dolphins kicks off summer of endurance

Successfully completing an arduous swim from the Isle of Mull to Oban on the evening of Friday 7 May was just the start of a ‘summer of endurance’ for James Armour, who is raising funds for conservation charity the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust.

As a warm up for a mammoth endurance challenge later this year, James set off from Grass Point on Mull and swam 5.5km through the strong tidal waters of the Firth of Lorne – arriving at Kerrera Ferry Terminal on the mainland after 2 hours 46 minutes.

Boat support to ensure a safe crossing was given by local wildlife guides Basking Shark Scotland, with outdoors adventure experts Primal Adventures providing logistical support.

The year is set to get even tougher for James, who is setting out to raise at least £10,000 for charity by becoming the first person ever to swim, run and cycle the length of the Outer Hebrides in one attempt.

In a challenge called the Selkie Race – after the mythical seal folk who shed their skins and venture ashore – James will set off on 30 July and make his way across land and sea during his non-stop epic adventure.

Starting at Barra Head Lighthouse – the southern tip of the Outer Isles – James will swim 20 miles, run 52 miles and cycle 112 miles to reach the northern tip of the Outer Hebrides at the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse.

“Our Atlantic waters are blessed with spectacular native species including minke whales, basking sharks, killer whales, harbour porpoises, bottlenose dolphins and much more. Yet unfortunately, these animals are facing many human-driven pressures such as warming seas, plastic pollution and net entanglement.

So my race is an opportunity to give back to the conservation of these species and our precious oceans, by supporting the wonderful work of the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust.

The Scottish isles are a beautiful place. The nature, wildlife and scenery are what make them incredibly special, and I want this race to be an opportunity to share the beauty of these islands and encourage all of us to connect with nature once again.”

JAMES ARMOUR

The Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust monitors and protects whales, dolphins and porpoises in areas of critical habitat on the west coast of Scotland. Its programme of science, education and engagement works to ensure these remarkable mammals thrive in harmony alongside coastal communities and have a safe long-term future.

“James is setting out to do something absolutely remarkable for Scotland’s whales, dolphins and porpoises. We are beyond grateful, and we’ll be wishing him lots of luck every step, pedal and kick of the way”

 ALISON LOMAX, HWDT DIRECTOR

JAMES CAN ALSO BE FOLLOWED ON INSTAGRAM AT @JAMESARMOUR_ AS HE PREPARES FOR THE SELKIE RACE IN WHAT HE DESCRIBES AS A ‘SUFFER-FEST’ OF TRAINING IN ICY WATER AND EARLY MORNING STARTS.

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MOLLIE HUGHES AND OCEAN VERTICAL

 

“Here at Ocean Vertical HQ we have some very exciting news, we are welcoming world-record breaking mountaineer and polar expeditioner Mollie Hughes to the team as a Director of OV.

Mollie will join forces with founders Adrian Boot and Stevie Boyle to help elevate Ocean Vertical to the next level over the coming years. We have a clear ambition to create ethical, accessible adventures across Scotland and we can’t wait for Mollie to join us on this journey.”

READ MORE HERE.

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Frontline care worker fights stress of Covid with icy plunges

Visitors have flocked to Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park in search of cold water therapy and the health benefits of nature.

 

A mum has told how plunging into icy lochs has helped stop her panic attacks and reduce her stress levels after returning to work in a care home during the coronavirus pandemic.

Danielle McGinlay’s mental health was suffering when, having been off on maternity leave, she went back to work in a nursing home.

She said: “I hit a low point in September. I have had issues on and off with my mental health for years and returning to work in a nursing home last year during Covid, after being off for maternity leave, wasn’t easy. I was having panic attacks and couldn’t sleep.

“I came across a YouTube video about people who used cold water therapy to help their mental health. I had never done anything like that before but what did I have to lose?” READ FULL RELEASE HERE.

Danielle McGinlay, a 30-year-old healthcare support worker, said being in the cold water allows her mind to be completely still.

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Appointment of Director of Industry and Destination Development

VisitScotland has today announced the appointment of a new Director of Industry and Destination Development to succeed Riddell Graham, who is retiring in September after 45 years’ service to Scottish tourism.

Rob Dickson, Executive Director (Corporate Improvement & Economy) at Scottish Borders Council will take up the role at the national tourism organisation on 11 August.

Rob has held senior roles in Scottish Borders Council and the Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames. More recently, he was pivotal in setting up the South of Scotland Enterprise Agency (SOSE) and he has led on economic development in the Scottish Borders, recently helping to deliver the Borderlands Inclusive Growth Deal.

VisitScotland Chief Executive Malcolm Roughead said: “We are delighted to welcome Rob to VisitScotland. Rob has considerable expertise and personal interest in environmental issues. This, coupled with his strong customer service ethic, will enable him to lead on our vital community engagement programme among partners, businesses, and individuals as we plan for a sustainable tourism recovery.

“Rob will work with many teams the length and breadth of Scotland and is joining VisitScotland at a critical stage as we focus on the recovery of the industry, building a destination and visitor experience which allows tourism and events to flourish now and in the future. Rob will play a key role, alongside the Leadership Group, in shaping that future for Scotland’s tourism and events sector.

“I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Riddell for his service to Scottish tourism. Riddell has played a vital role over the years at VisitScotland. Notably, over the last 12 months, he has been central in supporting the industry during the pandemic.”

 Rob Dickson said: “I am delighted to be joining VisitScotland. We have all faced the most challenging of times in the last year and I hope the experience I bring from my work in the Scottish Borders and across the south of Scotland can help support the recovery of the tourism and events sector in Scotland.  Riddell Graham has contributed 45 years of outstanding service to tourism in Scotland; I feel privileged to have been selected to take on the responsibilities he has carried so successfully for many years. I look forward to meeting and working with the wide range of people who I know are committed to making Scotland the world leader in 21st century tourism.”

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Epic swim for Scotland’s whales and dolphins kicks off summer of endurance 

Successfully completing an arduous swim from the Isle of Mull to Oban on the evening of Friday 7 May was just the start of a ‘summer of endurance’ for James Armour, who is raising funds for conservation charity the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust.

As a warm up for a mammoth endurance challenge later this year, James set off from Grass Point on Mull and swam 5.5km through the strong tidal waters of the Firth of Lorne – arriving at Kerrera Ferry Terminal on the mainland after two hours, 46 minutes.

Boat support to ensure a safe crossing was given by local wildlife guides Basking Shark Scotland, with outdoors adventure experts Primal Adventures providing logistical support.

The year is set to get even tougher for James, who is setting out to raise at least £10,000 for the Trust by becoming the first person ever to swim, run and cycle the length of the Outer Hebrides in one attempt.

In a challenge called the Selkie Race – after the mythical seal folk who shed their skins and venture ashore – James will set off on 30 July and make his way across land and sea during his non-stop epic adventure.

Starting at Barra Head Lighthouse – the southern tip of the Outer Isles – James will swim 20 miles, run 52 miles and cycle 112 miles to reach the northern tip of the Outer Hebrides at the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse.

“Our Atlantic waters are blessed with spectacular native species including minke whales, basking sharks, killer whales, harbour porpoises, bottlenose dolphins and much more. Yet unfortunately these animals are facing many human-driven pressures such as warming seas, plastic pollution and net entanglement,” said James.

“So my race is an opportunity to give back to the conservation of these species and our precious oceans, by supporting the wonderful work of the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust.

“The Scottish isles are a beautiful place. The nature, wildlife and scenery are what make them incredibly special, and I want this race to be an opportunity to share the beauty of these islands and encourage all of us to connect with nature once again.”

The Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust monitors and protects whales, dolphins and porpoises in areas of critical habitat on the west coast of Scotland. Its programme of science, education and engagement works to ensure these remarkable mammals thrive in harmony alongside coastal communities and have a safe long-term future.

“James is setting out to do something absolutely remarkable for Scotland’s whales, dolphins and porpoises. We are beyond grateful, and we’ll be wishing him lots of luck every step, pedal and kick of the way,” said the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust’s Director Alison Lomax.

To support James, visit http://bit.ly/SelkieRace to donate.

James can also be followed on Instagram at @jamesarmour_ as he prepares for the Selkie Race in what he describes as a ‘suffer-fest’ of training in icy water and early morning starts.

For more details about the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust, see hwdt.org.

 

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Leading conservation charity launches marine festival to help protect Scotland’s marine environment

One of the UK’s leading conservation and education charities, the Scottish Seabird Centre, will host its first ever Marine Fest from 31 May to 13 June 2021 to raise awareness of the diversity of Scotland’s marine environment and wildlife and the pressures facing them.

The Marine Fest programme was officially launched as Scotland’s Covid-19 restrictions eased and the charity’s Visitor Centre in North Berwick reopened to the public. The programme includes a range of events, talks, walks and workshops in person at the visitor centre and digitally – from live science shows, rockpool rambles, bird identification walks, beach cleans and bio blitzes, to puppet shows, storytelling walks, felting, sand sculpting, sketching, and even a workshop to address football’s plastic problem.

The new festival, supported by EventScotland as part of the Year of Coasts and Waters 20/21 and Scotland’s Events Recovery Fund, will enable festival goers to learn more about Scotland’s seas and the challenges they face (especially the climate emergency). People will be prompted to think about the behavioural changes they can make to reduce the negative impacts of human activity on marine and coastal habitats.

In 2021, Scotland continues to celebrate its coasts and waters with a programme of activities and events which will shine a spotlight on these vital elements of our landscape.

Speaking at the reopening, the charity’s Chief Executive, Susan Davies said: “As climate change warms our oceans and threatens the basis of all life, our conservation and education work is now more important than ever. Our Marine Fest programme of activities should provide something for members of the local community and visitors to enjoy. We would like to thank EventScotland for their support through Scotland’s Year of Coasts and Waters, which has allowed us to create this new festival.”

“The climate crisis is one of the most challenging issues to address but there are steps everyone can take individually, or in our communities, that can help reduce the overall pressures on our marine environment and seabirds. At the Scottish Seabird Centre, we help people to understand some of the things they can do to address this, we explain marine science, prompt ideas and motivate people to make their own behavioural changes in response to the climate crisis.”

Paul Bush OBE, Director of Events at VisitScotland, said: “We are delighted to support Marine Fest as part of Year of Coasts and Waters 20/21. Scotland offers the perfect stage to explore our natural environment and this year’s festival will combine live and digital events to showcase and celebrate the country’s marine environment and wildlife.” 

 The Scottish Seabird Centre is now open daily and their Marine Fest will run from 31 May-13 June 2021.

For more information visit:www.seabird.org

Picture: James Glossop/ The Times ‘Chumming’ trip in the North Sea. Gannets are fed fish from a boat chartered by the Scottish Seabird Centre floating near the Bass Rock, off North Berwick. Please mention the Scottish Seabird Centre in the caption! 24-09-20

 

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Marine Tourism Industry calls on boaters to Respect Rural and Island Destinations.


As lockdown continues to be eased across Scotland a joint plea has been made by marine tourism and sports groups for boaters and water users to have full consideration and respect for the destinations they plan to visit.
#RespectTheDestination has been launched today by; Sail Scotland, RYA Scotland, British Marine Scotland and Wild Scotland. The campaign will be promoted across social media channels to reach leisure and commercial boaters reminding them different arrangements, levels of service and local access controls may in place at popular sailing and boating destinations.

The key messages within the campaign are:
Plan Ahead
• Check national and local guidelines to ensure you and your crew are aware of safe travel guidance, this may include Covid-19 testing measures, or affect passage planning and overnight stays.
• Your destination may require pre-booking for berthing or mooring.
• Services may be limited such as fuel supply, water, showers, or stepping-ashore may be restricted.
Arrive Safely
• Landing or launching places may have some form of hygiene regime.
• Consider wearing gloves or apply additional cleaning measures when handling mooring or berthing equipment.
• Vessels anchoring or mooring should follow local access guidance.

Think Local
• Consider wearing a facemask, adhere to physical distancing guidance and respect local restrictions – even if you have been vaccinated.
• Be considerate to local track and trace procedures – it’s for all our good.
• Buy local. Support local businesses whenever possible.

Sail Scotland CEO Alan Rankin said. “Through our dealings with a wide range of island and coastal businesses, moorings, marinas, harbours and commercial boat operators it is clear different locations and local communities have differing approaches to the re-opening to visitors. We hope those taking to the water in what is likely to be a very busy summer season put the wishes of communities foremost when planning trips. Step-ashore spend brings significant economic benefit to rural locations and will play a vital role in the economic recovery of coastal and island communities.”
Rankin added “The #RespectTheDestination campaign will sit alongside the VisitScotland Keep Scotland Special campaign #RespectProtectEnjoy aiming to protect the stunning landscapes and wildlife that Scotland is famous for. https://www.visitscotland.org/news/2021/responsible-visitor-management-campaign #RespectTheDestination emerged from the Covid-19 guidelines developed in 2020 by Sail Scotland and RYA Scotland which reach across the commercial charter and leisure boating sectors respectively. A year on, the circumstances and messages remain much the same for boaters to respect the wishes of these more remote communities.

Chief Executive Officer of RYA Scotland, James Allan said,
“Getting back on the water and heading off to our favourite destinations is something we have all been looking forward to for a very long time now. The communities that the boating community frequent will undoubtedly be glad to see some welcome business return but we know not everyone in all these places will be ready just yet. #RespectTheDestination is all about being sensitive to these communities and their wishes, keeping everyone safe and sharing in the welcome return to the water.”
RYA Scotland has produced the following video to support the campaign and promote safe sailing as people return to the water as lockdown is eased.

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Pioneering rewilding project aims to be first of its kind in Scotland

Almost 20 years after spearheading the reintroduction of the beaver to Scotland, Bamff Estate in Perthshire now aims to go further with a pioneering rewilding project to help tackle the nature and climate crises, while inspiring similar initiatives on other farms.

Led by a mother and daughter team, the family-run upland farm aims to create Bamff Wildland by rewilding of 450 acres – with 12 fields, six woods and some of the UK’s most impressive beaver territories transformed into a nature-rich connected area of land.

Sheep have been removed from the fields, and after a fallow year this land will be linked to the woods and beaver wetlands to form a single rewilding zone – the first of its kind in Scotland.

Small numbers of native breeds of pigs, cattle and ponies as proxies for their wild ancestors, will be introduced to create a dynamic mosaic of diverse habitats through conservation grazing. Eventually the animals will be able to roam freely across the whole 450 acres, in an approach shown to be critical for nature to thrive.

A crowdfunder to make Bamff Wildland a reality aims to raise at least £24,000 by 2 May.

Funds are needed to kickstart the project, including by creating a perimeter fence so the estate’s internal fencing can eventually be removed. Although the work is all being done for public benefit, currently much of it is not eligible for government funding.

“As our climate destabilises and threatens human survival, and with heartbreaking accounts of wildlife numbers crashing internationally, farmers and landowners have a responsibility to respond to these twin crises.” said Sophie Ramsay of Bamff Wildland.

“Rewilding is a powerful way of restoring nature to boost wildlife, soak up carbon dioxide and tackle climate breakdown impacts such as flooding and drought. More ambition for large-scale rewilding on less productive farmland is needed now, across the countryside.”

The initiative is inspired by Knepp Castle Estate in West Sussex, where – as described by Isabella Tree in her best-selling book Wilding – “putting nature back in the driving seat” has led to remarkable increases in wildlife, including nationally and internationally endangered species.

Bamff Wildland’s Crowdfunder, launched on April 1, has already met over 80% of the initial target with two more weeks to go – attracting donations of all sizes and many supportive comments and shares on social media. Rewards for donations include the chance to “Adopt a Copse” or “Become a Founding Bamff Rewilder”.

“Through a programme of careful monitoring, Bamff Wildland will show what rewilding can do for our diminishing wildlife and for climate action on a Scottish upland sheep farm. Bamff is an averaged sized landholding and could be an example for many similar farms,” said Sophie, adding. “We will still grow food on other parts of the farm.  We believe in more land given over for rewilding, and for connectivity of habitat but also in the importance of local food production.”

“Our Crowdfunder is also helping  to demonstrate how public support for rewilding is growing. We hope this will encourage the Scottish Government to support widespread rewilding on marginal land across Scotland, to help meet our climate and biodiversity targets in a cost-effective way.

“Every single donation will make a difference. It’s an opportunity for people to be part of a groundbreaking project to benefit nature, climate and people.”

Future plans for Bamff Wildland include the creation of ponds, planting of native woodlands and wildflower areas, and erection of osprey platforms. The family is also interested in eventually reintroducing rare or locally extinct amphibian species such as the agile frog, pool frog, moor frog and great crested newt.  New walking trails across the estate are being created this summer to add to existing access.

To support the appeal, visit crowdfunder.co.uk/bamff-wild-land.

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